Recent Symposium Lectures

  • Dr. Stefan Baums delivers talk about ancient Buddhist manuscripts, February 28
    Dr. Stefan Baums delivers talk about ancient Buddhist manuscripts, February 28
  • BA student Kristina Zavaleta delivers her paper at the Student Symposium
    BA student Kristina Zavaleta delivers her paper at the Student Symposium

Exploring Neo-Confucian Visions of Childhood and Children’s Education On February 4, we welcomed Dr. Susan Fernsebner, a professor at Mary Washington College in Virginia. Drawing on the work of T’ang dynasty author, Mengqiu (촁헹), Dr. Fernsebner explored the historical relationship of adults and children, Neo-Confucian visions of the proper methods for raising children, and the ways in which modern day actors have raised their own questions about educating youth. Key themes included gender, family, and education.

Ancient Buddhist Manuscripts from Gandhāra: An Introduction On February 28, Dr. Stefan Baums from the Institute for Indology and Tibetology of the University of Munich delivered a fascinating talk about ancient birch-bark scrolls that were recently discovered in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Produced between the first century BCE and the third century CE and written in the Middle Indian Gāndhārī language, the manuscripts provide a new understanding of early Chinese Buddhist literature.

Student Symposium The second annual DRBU Student Symposium was held on Sunday, Feb. 24. A total of 17 students from both the BA and MA programs delivered papers to an interested and supportive audience of students, faculty, and community members. Among the papers presented: “Putting the Yoga back in Yogācāra: An Embodied Phenomenological Approach to the Life of Master Xuyun”; “Can We Transform Our Habits?”; “From the Personal to the Social: Personal Transformation as a Means for Social Change”; and “Analyzing Loneliness in Cultivation”.